Tuesday, June 12, 2012

History Of Business Administration Education

Business administration school is a university-level institution that educates learners on such topics as accounting, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, strategy planning, and quantitative methods. Most business administration schools have experienced well-qualified faculties, and efficient managements. In 1881, the first 'collegiate business school' was founded in Wharton.

Business Schools before World War II were mostly "schools of commerce" and were conducted in relatively low esteem. After the Second World War and especially after 1960, Business Administration Schools began to grow rapidly. They are often known as university graduate schools. MBA degrees originally occurred in the United States of America, due to the fast industrialization growth that made it essential for companies to use scientific approaches to teach management. The first MBA degree was offered by Dartmouth College in 1900. Business schools have mushroomed and flourished in all states and countries thus, making them feasible for individuals who work during the day to take classes and earn degrees at night.

Since 1988, business schools have changed deans, altered curriculums, and stressed new expertise among their students. A MBA degree has opened abundant opportunities for its bearers. Presently, nearly all business positions require an MBA degree as the minimum qualification. This includes business managers in marketing, finance, human resources, operations, and information technology. Investment entities, banking companies and a number of management consulting firms prefer employing MBA graduates specializing in the field of finance. These graduates are well conversant in their respective fields. For industries such as media and entertainment, an MBA is not a necessity, but it is considered an additional asset.

There are wide ranges of options among the different academic institutions that offer business courses. Various sites are available wherein detailed information about all the specialization fields are mentioned along with their course details. These sites also offer information regarding the universities that are well qualified and offer competent MBA programs.

Business Card for Education Consultant - Helping Others to Learn By Learning About You

As an educational consultant, your primary goal is to assist as many educational instructors and facilities as to how they can maximize their abilities to teach students how to learn the best. However, it can be difficult to earn the respect and acknowledgement for your skills without some way to prove you're a valid professional in the field of education. A business card for education consultant professionals can go far, especially if you are seeking to establish yourself in a local community among educational professionals as being the best in your field.

What Can a Simple Card Do For You?

While there is a common misconception that a consulting business card doesn't speak to the person that you are, and is something that just about anyone can have, this is not true. Just think, when introducing yourself to a principal of the local elementary school, you will appear entirely unprofessional and perhaps less credible if you do not introduce yourself with professional educational business cards that reflect your dedication to your role. With professional business cards you can tell the educator who you are, what your specialty is and how to find you easily. Any quality educator will then have your card accessible for times when perhaps your assistance is needed.

Creating an Education Consultant Professional Card

The best part about creating a business card for education consultant professionals is that it is simple and quick. If you are planning on designing your own card, then it is suggested that you download some free software that will offer you a variety of business card designs free. With these programs you can choose a template with which you can then build your card from, or you can create and design your own based on what you feel will represent your profession.

Once you have completed your design, you want to be sure that the printing quality of your of them is superb, therefore it is always a good idea to send your digital education business card to a printing company that specializes in their creation. From that point your digital card will be printed on the finest quality paper, with the richest colors and even the finish that you wish your cards to have. Everything that is in your designs will be communicated into your actual professional card, and your set will be mailed back to you in just a short matter of time. While this process may seem expensive, most professionals are thoroughly pleased to know that cheap cards are available with the right printing company. Using a printing company makes the process simple and quick, but more importantly, it ensures that your cards are always going to appear professional and of quality.

Whether you are new to the profession or are merely attempting to market your consultant services in a better fashion, having a business card for education consultant professionals is important, especially if you want people to know that you take the education of all students seriously.

Expanding Your Business Expertise Through Continuing Education

We can all admit that keeping up with business trends can be quite difficult. As new industry developments are made, business professionals are increasingly faced with the need to complement their trade experience with modern-day expertise.

Luckily, staying on the cusp of change isn't as scary as it sounds. An easy and extremely rewarding way to boost up your business knowledge is by enrolling in a Continuing Education Business program. These programs can contribute to your academic repertoire without obliging you to a full-length degree program. By way of gaining new industry-specific knowledge, you will acquire a firmer grip on your current or prospective position, making you a savvy contender within your field.

If you're worried that you just won't be able to fit academia into your schedule, rest assured that most Continuing Education programs are designed so that you can. Two common misconceptions are that all higher-education programs require a full-time commitment and that the bulk of courses are only offered during the day. Neither of these is true. Most of these programs are offered by local colleges or universities, and sometimes include the option of distance or online learning, which gives you the luxury of completing courses from the comfort of your own home. This can be very convenient for people with heavy day-schedules or for those who are required to travel a lot for work. In cases where courses are not offered through distance or online learning options, there will typically be a night class option to enroll in.

Also, don't be fooled into thinking that continuing education is strictly geared towards professionals who already have a degree and decades of experience under their belt. The courses and programs offered are ideal for novice professionals who are just entering the business game, as well as field experts who simply want to increase their knowledge bank.

Even better, is that the programs span across a wide range of business fields. Business programs tend to be industry-specific, and include focused certificate or diploma programs within the general domains, including:

Accounting and Financial
Business Computers
Business Studies
Labor Studies
Leadership and Management
Office Skills

These domains touch on virtually every role within the business trade. So, whether you're a CEO seeking new ways to motivate and lead your team, or an administrator trying to find new and efficient ways to run an enterprise, there will likely be a business course that will focus on your specific professional goals.

The true philosophy behind the entire Continuing Education platform is that knowledge is a never-ending pursuit. Not only will a Business certificate or diploma ensure that you maintain a strong and steady career, but it will also encourage you to seek knowledge for your own personal growth.

How to Write an Education Business Proposal

Do you have an idea for a new educational program or service? Maybe you want to apply for a government grant for an after-school program for middle school kids, organize a private high school, or develop a network of tutors for hire.

How are you going to get the money you need and explain your ideas to the influential people who can make it happen? The best way is to master the art of writing a proposal.

If you are replying to an RFP (Request for Proposal) or applying for a specific grant, you need to follow any instructions specified in the RFP or grant application as precisely as possible. An RFP response typically requires combining government agency forms with topics you need to write from scratch - based on what the RFP asks you talk about.

All proposals follow a basic structure: introduction, the recipient/client-oriented section, the description of proposed goods and/or services, and then the proposal writer/supplier-oriented section. The content of each section will vary from one proposal to the next, but this sequence of sections should stay the same.

Let's break down those sections further. The introduction section is the shortest. The very first thing you'll want for your proposal is a Cover Letter. A Cover Letter should be brief, and it should contain the following four elements: a brief explanation of who you are, a statement about why you are submitting this proposal at this time, a statement of what you want the reader to do after reading your proposal--call for a meeting, sign the contract, etc., and all your contact information so the reader can easily call you with questions or to accept your proposal.

The very first page of your proposal package should be a Title Page--just name your proposal something appropriate, like "Advanced Science Seminars Offered for the Jacobi School Gifted Program" or "Proposal to Create a New Charter School in the West Valley School District." Next, if your proposal is long and detailed, you may want an Executive Summary or Client Summary Page, which is a summation of the most important points you want to make, and a Table of Contents to help readers easily see the contents and navigate through the proposal. That's all for the introduction section.

The next section should be focused on the proposal recipient or client. Depending on what you are proposing, the readers you want to target might be members of a grant committee, potential students, parents of students, teachers, school administrators, a loan committee, or a governmental organization. It's important to consider them carefully, and tailor your information to them. What do they want to know? What concerns might thdy have? Are there scheduling or budget restrictions? At the very least, this client-oriented section should have a Requirements page that summarizes what they have asked for, or what you believe they need. You may also want pages like Schedule, Deadlines, Limitations, Budget, Goals, Considerations, Special Needs, and so forth, to describe in detail your understanding of what the client needs. This is not yet the time to brag about your proposed program or your organization. Keep this section focused on information about what the client wants or needs.

The next section is a description of your ideas. Be sure to match them up with the previous section, explaining how you can address the client's needs, how the client will benefit from your proposed program, and what your proposal will cost to implement. Don't use generic sales jargon. Instead, be as specific as possible about what you plan to do. This section could contain a wide variety of topic pages, like Classes, Equipment, Schedule, Staff, Venues, Tutoring, Testing, Mentoring, Evaluation, and so forth--you'll include whatever you need to thoroughly describe your proposal. At a bare minimum, you'll want a Services Offered, Benefits, and a Cost Summary page in this section.

After you have thoroughly described what you want to do and how much it will cost, it's time to tell the proposal readers all about you in the final section. What makes you or your organization qualified to take on this job? It's not enough to simply say "I can do it" or boast about how smart you are. Keep in mind that it's always best to provide evidence or testimonials from other parties than to do your own bragging. Do you have special Training, Certifications, or Education? Do you have an extensive Company History, a long list of Clients, or years of Experience in the field? Have you won Awards? Do you have Testimonials or Case Studies to offer to show how you have been successful in the past? Include any information that helps persuade the clients that you have the knowledge and professionalism to carry out your proposal promises.

At this point, you will have completed the first draft of your proposal. Congratulations! Now for the finishing touches. Have a qualified proofreader or editor read through your draft and fix any grammatical or spelling errors. It's always best to enlist someone who is not familiar with your ideas to do this. That person is much more likely to catch errors and ask important questions than someone who knows your proposal well. It would be especially embarrassing to submit an error-ridden proposal for an education project, wouldn't it?

After the words are perfect, make sure each page looks good, too. You might want to use visual details like splashes of color in titles or special bullet points to add interest, but keep the overall look professional.